Happy New Year! In Arabic: a usual Gulf Arabic greetings for New year and main festivals.

Happy New Year!
In Arabic: a usual Gulf Arabic greetings for New year and main festivals.

Dear readers,

Before it is too late, I wish you all a happy 2015!

As expected, 2014 was a busy year. I have been busy with the achievement of two of my main projects: the Ras Ghimb castle in Gondar and the Department of Paleontology at the National Museum of Ethiopia in Addis Ababa. There were many other projects in 2014 at the French Center for Ethiopian Studies such as the First Conference of Islamic Manuscripts held on March,  the publication of the Ethiopian CityGuides, etc.  Read the rest of this entry »

Tripolitania, un via de Tripoli

Commemorative Postcard, Italy or Libya, ca. 1915, DR.

In the midst of the last developments of liberated Libya, we’ve ‘forgotten’ to remember October 5th 1911*: the day the Italian army invaded Libya and started its colonisation. What’s the (political) meaning of commemorating history in Libya? This short article examines the political role of rewriting history in the context of Qaddafi’s regime and questions its future in the reconstruction of Libya.

On October 5 1911, Italian troops invaded Tripoli of Libya. After months of rising tensions between Italian and Turkish (Ottoman) governments, the Italian Navy had started to bomb the port of Tripoli leading to the invasion of Tripoli and Tripolitania. It took few years to the Italian Republican and Fascist troops to conquer what was to become Libya in 1934 after Cyrenaica was conquered and united with Fezzan and Tripolitania. Ironically, the centennial coincides with the 150th anniversary of the proclamation of the Kingdom of Italy. 1861, 1911, 2011: history seems to defy common sense in mixing dates. One wonders how the former regime would have orchestrated commemorations… No doubt it would have been a great post-colonial show as the resistance of Libyans to the Italian colonisation had been erected as a fundament of the ideology of Qaddafi’s ‘revolutionary’ regime. This short article – these are personal notes and reflections- examines the political role of rewriting history in the Libyan context and its future in the reconstruction of Libya.

Rewriting History

Historical studies were leaded and controlled by the Markaz al-Jihad (Research and Documentation Centre on the Historical Jihad [in this case resistance]). Created in 1978, that research center have been for more than 30 years a pillar of  Qaddafism. As explained by Clémence Weulersse (click here to read the article), its first role was to “liberate” the history of Libya that had been written by imperialist hands; in this pseudo-Marxist doxa, liberating history aimed at liberating minds. Second, the Markaz al-Jihad aimed at proving the possibility of the (Gadhafist) revolution in rewriting the history of Libya: Read the rest of this entry »

  Camille el Kareh, Self-portrait , Lebanon 1920

Camille el Kareh, Self-portrait, Zhorta, Lebanon, 1920, Collection: AIF/Mohsen Yammine Copyright © Arab Image Foundation

I work now as a Research Associate for the Arab Image Foundation in Beirut on a strategic program called the Middle East Photograph Preservation Initiative (MEPPI). MEPPI is led jointly with the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the University of Delaware, the Getty Conservation Institute and the Qatar Museums Authority.
MEPPI main goal is to raise regional awareness and expertise in photograph preservation
. This initiative has three interconnected components:

– The MEPPI Survey, a survey aimed at identifying and assessing significant photograph holdings in the Arab world. Our scope also extends to collections in Turkey, Iran and Afghanistan.
– The MEPPI Courses, a series of courses, where collection keepers will be invited to learn and share best practices about photograph preservation.
– The MEPPI Symposium, where regional cultural policy decision-makers will be invited to reflect upon the importance of photographic heritage.
Read the rest of this entry »

News and updates

April 5, 2011

Until #Feb17 events in Libya, I was in charge of a team whose responsibility was the creation of a centre for digital conservation of Libyan historical archives in Tripoli. Of course, our activities stopped and I’m back in France.
I’ve found a shelter near Lille and settled in front of the computer.

What’s on the shelf now?

I’m looking for a job in Heritage management and/or research. I’m applying widely to positions in Middle East, North Africa and Europe. Read the rest of this entry »

Interview dcliquer sur le logoiffusée sur France Info (et France Inter) le 7/04/2010 autour de la conférence tenue au Caire sur les restitutions d’œuvres de patrimoine (clic clic)
Rappel autour de l’événement : ici pour l’effet d’annonce (le Bandung du patrimoine) et pour les résultats de la conférence.

Plus sur ce blog bientôt ou relisez les articles écrits sur ce sujet:
– un portrait de Zahi Hawass
– une mise en perspective des  questions de propriété
– Une ébauche d’étude des mécanismes institutionnels de restitution
Whose Pharaohs?